Where to See the Transit of Venus Online

Bookmark this page for some online viewing options for the upcoming transit of Venus.

Though the transit of Venus is viewable for several hours across much of the globe, the complete transit can only be seen near the Pacific — i.e., Hawaii, Alaska, Australia, and parts of Asia, unless you take to the sea. So if you don't want to miss a wink of this last-in-our-lifetime event, check out some of the live feeds below that will be available from around the world.

If you or someone you know is hosting a live feed online, let us know and we'll post it here!

More transit coverage:

See This Week’s SkyWeek Video

Your Viewing Guide to the Transit of Venus

June 5-6’s Transit of Venus

Will You See the Black Drop?

View the Sun Safely During the Transit

Time-Traveling Transit

How to Photograph the Transit

10 thoughts on “Where to See the Transit of Venus Online

  1. Ken Winters

    The link marked "June 5-6’s Transit of Venus" actually links to Kelly Beatty’s column on the annular eclipse. It’s an excellant column, but not helpful here.

  2. Mary Anne

    Does anyone know where I can learn more about the relative roles of the Earth’s motion and Venus’s motion in the speed and angle of the transit? The predicted angle across the face of the sun seems greater than the 3.25 degree offset of Venus’s orbit from the ecliptic.

  3. Matt Reynolds

    I didn’t have a solar filter so I couldn’t look straight through my telescope, but I did have a white paper plate which is a very good and cheap way to get job done. So glad I saw it today because I know I’m not living to 2117.

  4. Matt Reynolds

    I didn’t have a solar filter so I couldn’t look straight through my telescope, but I did have a white paper plate which is a very good and cheap way to get job done. So glad I saw it today because I know I’m not living to 2117.

  5. Tom Morgan

    Admittedly I haven’t been listening to all the commentary on the various web sites I’ve been looking at. Mostly, I’ve been observing the Exploratoriam site from Mauna Loa. In any case, this site (and most others, show the transit passing from ~10:30 down to ~2:30. My naked eye (w/#14 filter) sees it ~12:30 to ?? (4:00?). It’s 7:50 CDT and Venus is now about 2:00 and roughly the same % in from the edge as I see on the Mauna Loa broadcast. (I think I’ve seen some other sites with yet-different orientations.) What’s the explanation?

  6. Rick

    Myself and four others were observing the Venus transit when we saw a satellite transit the sun as well, itself transiting Venus. The satellite had two sets of solar panels, and was appox 1 arc-minute wide.

    The time was appox 7:54 cdt, location 43.185 north, 88.753 west.

    As the satellite ended the transit I was able to make out the solar panels off the edge of the Sun for a brief second (they were now bright against a dark background,through the solar filter of course)

    Any help figuring out what we saw?

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