Author Archives: Dennis Di Cicco

Explore Scientific at NEAF 2009

Explore Scientific's Scott Roberts discusses Explore's refractor line, its meteorite sets, and the David H. Levy Comet Hunter 6" f/4.8 Maksutov-Newtonian. And watch Russ Tanton wash Explore's amazing new waterproof 14-mm 100° AFOV eyepiece with soap and water! Click here to see additional videos from the 2009 Northeast Astronomy Forum in Suffern, New York. Click…

iOptron at NEAF 2009

iOptron's John Hou discusses the MiniTower altazimuth Go To mount and three new telescopes: a 127-mm f/7 ED triplet refractor, a 108-mm ED doublet refractor, and a 6-inch f/12 Maksutov-Cassegrain. And he shows a prototype for the forthcoming Supreme German equatorial mount. Click here to see additional videos from the 2009 Northeast Astronomy Forum in…

Celestron at NEAF 2009

Celestron's Victor Aniceto discusses the CGEM and CGE Pro German equatorial mounts and the exciting new $50 FirstScope 3-inch reflector. Click here to see additional videos from the 2009 Northeast Astronomy Forum in Suffern, New York. Click here to return to our Product Videos page.

Apogee Instruments at NEAF 2009

Watch Apogee Instruments's Tim Puckett discuss the Alta U16M, U9000, and U8300 large-format CCD cameras with advanced cooling systems, and the latest AFW filter wheel. Click here to see additional videos from the 2009 Northeast Astronomy Forum in Suffern, New York. Click here to return to our Product Videos page.

Imaging the Orion-Eridanus Superbubble

In the April 2009 issue, beginning with the photographic spread on pages 66-67, Sean Walker (S&T’s Imaging editor) and I describe our efforts using commercially available equipment and image-processing software to create a huge mosaic covering nearly 10% of the sky. As we noted in the story, the mosaic is not our yet-to-be-completed “final” image,…

Venus Express

Call for Images of Venus

Venus Express project scientists are inviting amateur and professional astronomers to contribute Earth-based images of the planet made at infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavelengths.

A “Starfish” is Born

While big telescopes were certainly attracting lots of attention at last month's RTMC Astronomy Expo in California, a little camera from Fishcamp Engineering was equally exciting to many astrophotographers.

Starry Starry Night

Open star clusters are among the most straightforward deep-sky objects to observe with binoculars, and three wonderful targets for Northern Hemisphere observers ride high overhead as darkness falls at this time of year.

Bigha StarSeeker

Laid-Back Astronomy

Binoculars are one of the best ways to explore the starry night sky. The StarSeeker, a motorized observing chair from Bigha, offers an incredibly comfortable way to scan the heavens with two eyes.