Get Involved

Perhaps you’ve noticed your night skies are growing brighter every year. Maybe you’ve delved deep into observing variable stars and are ready to contribute your measurements to the pros. Or maybe you don’t even own a telescope but still want to take part in astronomy. There’s a place in the astronomy community for you, so jump in and get started!

Citizen Science Projects – Take part in astronomy, even if you don’t have a telescope!
Pro-Am Collaborations – Contribute your amateur observing resources to professional research
Save Dark Skies! – Find out how you can help take a stand against light pollution

Great World Wide Star Count

A Star Count for Everyone

Take part in this year's Great World Wide Star Count, and you'll be joining thousands of other "citizen scientists" in raising dark-sky awareness around the globe.

List of Citizen-Science Projects

The internet has become a priceless tool for the citizen-science movement, in which private citizens all over the world can make meaningful contributions to science. With as little as a computer and some curiosity, you can help scientists determine targets for space telescopes, or look for signs of life on Kepler planets. Some projects, like…

List of Amateur Research Organizations

Modern technology allows amateurs around the globe to collaborate in ways never before possible. The following is a collection of some of the research projects we find most interesting, many of which involve collaboration with professional astronomers at universities and other research organizations. These projects generally require more sophisticated equipment or technical expertise than the…

Cheney in Times Square

AMA Addresses Light Pollution

The American Medical Association has released a report detailing several possible health concerns related to nighttime light exposure. But some lighting researchers worry the conclusions are more alarmist than is warranted.

Great World Wide Star Count

How Dark Are Your Skies?

Take part in this year's Great World Wide Star Count, and you'll be joining thousands of other "citizen scientists" in raising dark-sky awareness around the globe.

New Comet Machholz

California's comet-hunting veteran Don Machholz bagged his 11th discovery on March 23 and 26, 2010. It's a faint diffuse comet, low in the morning sky.

Citizen Sky Wants You!

Backyard astronomers of all types and experience levels can participate in a real-world science project — and help solve a mystery involving the star Epsilon Aurigae that's puzzled astronomers since 1821.