Some stargazers find the moon a nuisance. Its brightness makes it difficult to observe the faint fuzzies we love so much. But observing the moon is an age old tradition and it certainly has its charms, be it a luminous orb that lights up the terrain in front of you or a razor-thin slice with shadows scraping against the crater walls.

We offer an array of tips and tricks for observing our friendliest neighbor. We’ll provide maps to help you locate famous seas, mountains, craters and Apollo landing sites. We’ll even help you glimpse the far side of the moon . . . well the 9% you can see on Earth from time to time. Once you’ve read through each of our articles you’ll be a lunar expert, more familiar with the terrain than Neil Armstrong.

The craters Messier and Messier A

Messier on the Moon

Oblique impact resolves the mystery of one of the most bizarre crater pairs on the Moon: Messier and Messier A. Previous explanations for this crater pair ranged from imaginative to fantastical. All were wrong.

Mare Nectaris

Rings and Things

Mare Nectaris is the smallest of the circular maria on the Moon; lavas extend only 350 kilometers from shore to shore. But the Nectaris basin is beautifully defined by the spectacular Altai Scarp, which forms the southwestern rim of the basin.