Types of Objects to Observe

Sky & Telescope brings you hundreds of articles on observing celestial bodies. Take a tour of the night sky from near-earth objects to distant Messier objects. We’ll provide useful tips whether you want to spend 10 minutes outside peering at Jupiter’s moons through a small pair of binoculars or spend hours on end attempting to get the perfect photograph of that distant galaxy.

Our articles look at objects in space visible throughout the year, during a particular season, and special events for a single day, such as eclipses and occultations. We’ll help you through the coldest nights by sharing space facts, or to put it more eloquently, the wonders of the universe.

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What Is A Supermoon?

The perpetuation of the supermoon myth is mostly motivated by desire for publicity. But much of what we call the supermoon is just our eyes playing tricks on us.

Saturn on Feb. 23

A Saturn Almanac

Spectacular Saturn is a perennial favorite of telescope users everywhere. Click here to find printable data on the positions of Saturn's rings and planets.

Full Moon

The Lunar 100

As the moon wanes in the gibbous phase in the nights to come, see if you can find and observe some of 100 of Charles Wood's classic lunar hit list, including craters, basins, mountains, rilles, and domes.

Full Moon

Once in a Blue Moon

We'll see a "blue Moon" next Friday, but what does that mean? From the Middle Ages to the game of Trivial Pursuit, a folklorist explores the origin of the phrase.

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Occultation Web Resources

Occultations of stars and planets by the Moon and asteroids are exciting to watch, and amateur occultation timings can have real scientific value. But first you need to know what occultations will be happening in your area.

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Digging Deep in M33

The Triangulum Galaxy shows more detail through backyard telescopes than any other galaxies except the Magellanic Clouds and our own home, the Milky Way. But M33's treasures don't just jump out and grab your eye. To see them, you need dark skies, patience . . . and this guide from the December 2004 issue...