Beyond the Printed Page

You’ll find here the digital extras that accompany our feature articles, including interviews with world-renowned experts, simulations of the newest astronomical theories, and extensive image galleries. Go beyond the printed page to explore the multimedia world of science discovery and community interaction.

Don’t know where to start? Here are some suggestions: After reading about the role of citizen science in astronomy in the March 2014 cover story, check out Meg Lamb’s online article about two of the newest Zooniverse programs looking for your participation: Space Warps and Planet Four. Or watch simulations of the unfolding universe that accompanied Joel Primack’s July 2012 cover story on the newest cosmology results. And don’t miss editor in chief Robert Naeye’s exclusive interview with exoplanet expert and MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient Sara Seager (MIT).

Default entry screen for NASA JPL HORIZONS Web-Interface.

Generating an Ephemeris

Terry N. Trees show us how to create an ephemeris, a table showing a celestial object's calculated positions for a given time period, using JPL HORIZONS data.

Mutual Events of Jupiter’s Satellites in 2014–15

A full season of mutual events for Jupiter's four largest satellites As Jupiter shines brightly down from the sky during its 2014–15 apparition, quite often Jupiter's four big Galilean moons will occult and cast their shadows on each other. A "mutual events season" like this happens about every 6 years, when Earth and Sun...

Planck temperature map of universe

What’s Next for Inflation Cosmology – New Updates

Our July 2014 cover story was the apparent discovery of gravitational waves from the instant of inflation when the Big Bang took shape. Just as the article was printed, a serious challenge to the discovery appeared: the researchers had underestimated the amount of interstellar dust that could be contaminating their data. Here are more...

High-redshift galaxy

An Image Gallery of the Cosmic Dawn

In the cover story of the June 2014 issue of Sky & Telescope, a team of scientists uses the Hubble Space Telescope to look back through cosmic time to the dawn of the universe, back to the time when galaxies were just beginning to form. With hundreds of hours of observing time on one...

Art of Sylvia 87 and two moons

The asteroid occultation of July 19, 2014

As told in the July 2014 Sky & Telescope, on the morning of July 19th an 8.7-magnitude star in Pisces will vanish for up to 4 seconds behind the invisibly faint asteroid 611 Valeria, as seen from a track crossing northern Mexico, Texas, the Deep South including the Atlanta area, and the Carolinas. The...

Cosmos

Cosmos Reborn

Beginning Sunday evening, March 9th, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey will air on the Fox television network, the rebirth of Carl Sagan's classic Cosmos. In the cover story of our April 2014 issue, contributing editor J. Kelly Beatty reveals a behind-the-scenes look at the new series. (All of the images here are courtesy of Fox...

Giant Magellan Telescope

The Megatelescopes are Coming

Robert Zimmerman writes in the March 2014 issue about the construction of the Giant Magellan Telescope, "demonstrating astronomical engineering of the highest order." The mammoth telescope will combine seven 8.4-meter (28-feet) mirrors into a flower-like primary with the resolving power of a mirro 24.5 meters (80 feet) wide. But the Giant Magellan Telescope isn’t...

Space warp

Become a Citizen Scientist

Join astronomers in two new citizen science projects, Space Warps and Planet Four, that will have you investigating the warped light from faraway galaxies and the ever-changing Martian landscape.

Texas State students Ava Pope, Laura Bright, and Hannah Reynolds stand with author Don Olson on the cliff high above the Jambourg beach to the southwest of Étretat. Visible in the background are the Needle and the Porte d’Aval, as seen from a perspective nearly opposite to that of Monet’s sunset painting.

Dating an Impressionist’s Sunset

S&T contributing editor Don Olson writes a feature article in the February 2014 issue connecting astronomy to Monet. We follow his team of celestial sleuths as they travel to Normandy, France to pin down the exact time and location of one of Claude Monet's most beautiful paintings. This gallery of photos, more than we...

3C 273

Quasar Hunting

The March 2014 issue of Sky & Telescope features an article by Bob Cava, who hunts for quasars in light-polluted New Jersey with his 10- and 16-inch telescopes. As Cava discovered, quasar hunting requires considerable skill with astronomical databases and online tools. This web supplement describes some useful resources and collects their URLs in...

Auroral activity in the UV light up Jupiter's polar regions. Similar aurora on exoplanets driven by stellar winds could be detectable in the UV or the radio.

The Radio Jove Project: Listening in on Jupiter

The January 2014 issue of Sky & Telescope features Yvette Cendes’s article on radio emission from Jupiter — and the possibility that we might soon hear similar radio signals from planets beyond our solar system. Even as astronomers race to catch the radio whispers from a hot Jupiter orbiting another star, NASA’s Radio Jove...

Jupiter

Jupiter Watchers

The cover story of S&T's January 2014 issue features the significant role amateur astronomers have played in planetary science, and especially the study of Jupiter, over the past decade. Amateurs have monitored everything from Jupiter's changeable weather to Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9's bruising impact. Jupiter watchers have received help and legitimacy for their discoveries from...

IceCube_Antarctica

South Pole Science

A behind-the-scenes look at the construction of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica, plus more information about science done at the South Pole. (This blog is an online companion to our January 2014 feature article on IceCube.)

Comet Hale-Bopp

The Greatest Comets of the Past Century

In the November 2013 issue of S&T, Joe Rao redirects Comet ISON speculation to answer a different question: just how often do showstopper comets grace our skies? His answer might surprise you. Rao looks back over all the comets of the past century, calling out examples of showstoppers, showpieces, and garden-variety comets. Readers predicted...

ALMA Observatory

How ALMA Works Its Magic

In the November 2013 issue of S&T, I write about a revolutionary new telescope being built in the Chilean Atacama Desert. The Atacama Large Millimiter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) explores a little-known region of the electromagnetic spectrum, waves that are longer than the farthest infrared but shorter than radio waves. Submillimeter/millimeter waves come from frigid gas...

Supernova 1987A

Join the Great Supernova Race

In the cover story of the October 2013 issue of Sky & Telescope, author Bob Zimmerman tells the story of the hunt for exploding stars. Professional astronomers have taken the lead in recent years with the advent of automated sky surveys, but amateurs have managed to stay in the game. Groups of amateur astronomers...

Water on Mars

How many times has NASA discovered water on Mars? For the answer, look in the September 2013 issue, where author Emily Lakdawalla sets the record straight. Orbiters and landers have returned so many beautiful high-res images, we couldn't include them all in the article. To see more of the photographic evidence for water on...