Beyond the Printed Page

You’ll find here the digital extras that accompany our feature articles, including interviews with world-renowned experts, simulations of the newest astronomical theories, and extensive image galleries. Go beyond the printed page to explore the multimedia world of science discovery and community interaction.

Don’t know where to start? Here are some suggestions: After reading about the role of citizen science in astronomy in the March 2014 cover story, check out Meg Lamb’s online article about two of the newest Zooniverse programs looking for your participation: Space Warps and Planet Four. Or watch simulations of the unfolding universe that accompanied Joel Primack’s July 2012 cover story on the newest cosmology results. And don’t miss editor in chief Robert Naeye’s exclusive interview with exoplanet expert and MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient Sara Seager (MIT).

NGC 3172 by David Ratledge

Circumpolar Galaxies

In our February 2016 issue, Contributing Editor Steve Gottlieb provided some inspiration for observing galaxies in "the far north," or above +85° declination. On a single night at a remote site in the Sierra Nevada range (7,200 feet elevation), he observed  35 circumpolar galaxies, including a few below the +85° cut-off limit. Here, we're...

Elliptical Galaxy IC 2006

Monster Galaxies

Take advantage of early evenings and dark winter skies — turn your scope southward to view some of the most massive objects in the universe.

The Herschel Sprint

Observers can experience Herschel’s “Night of Discovery,” featured in the April 2015 issue of Sky & Telescope, for themselves. Like the Messier Marathon, the Herschel Sprint can be completed in one moonless night in the spring. Purists can recreate the sweep using an eyepiece that provides a magnification of about 150x, sweeping in a...

Gottlieb KTG

Isolated Triplets of Galaxies

S&T contributor Steve Gottlieb has made available data distilled from the Karanchentseva catalogue and his own observations to assist you in your observations of isolated triplets of galaxies.


How to Use the WorldWide Telescope

The WorldWide Telescope (WWT), featured in the April 2015 issue of Sky & Telescope, isn't just another piece of planetarium software. Its incredible breadth and depth of data allow users to explore the universe in an interactive way. Coauthors Curtis Wong (Microsoft Research) and Alyssa Goodman (Harvard University and Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) teamed...


App-Powered Astronomy

In our March 2015 issue, we ask noted amateur and professional astronomers to highlight the astronomy apps they use most. These are apps that every astronomer should have in their back pocket, ranging from practical planetarium and weather apps, such as Scope Nights and Sky Safari 4, to science guides, such as Exoplanet and...


Flying Through Cosmic Voids

In the February 2015 issue of Sky & Telescope, author Marcus Woo walks readers through the science of cosmic voids. Here, videos demonstrate a sense of cosmic perspective, taking the reader on flights through the universe both theoretical and observed.

Default entry screen for NASA JPL HORIZONS Web-Interface.

Generating an Ephemeris

Terry N. Trees show us how to create an ephemeris, a table showing a celestial object's calculated positions for a given time period, using JPL HORIZONS data.

Mutual Events of Jupiter’s Satellites in 2014–15

A full season of mutual events for Jupiter's four largest satellites As Jupiter shines brightly down from the sky during its 2014–2015 apparition, quite often Jupiter's four big Galilean moons will occult and cast their shadows on each other. A "mutual events season" like this happens about every 6 years, when Earth and Sun...