Observing News & Current Celestial Events

Sky & Telescope is your one-stop shop for celestial events. Whether you want to find out how to observe a new comet or are just curious about what’s in the sky tonight, we’re here to help. For more than 70 years we’ve kept our readers up to speed on meteor showers, and the planets. When there’s a new supernova, come here to find sky charts and the latest news on how bright it is. From asteroids briefly blocking out stars to beautiful conjunctions of Venus and Jupiter, our blogs and podcasts will help you navigate the wonders of the night sky.

Moon crossing into Earth's umbra

Preview of April 4th’s Total Lunar Eclipse

An unusually brief total eclipse of the Moon will be visible before dawn this Saturday, April 4th, from western North America. The eclipse happens on Saturday evening for Australia and East Asia. The next total eclipse of the Moon, on Saturday, April 4th, will be the third in the current "tetrad" of four in...

Path of 2015's total solar eclipse

Getting to Totality: Not Easy!

As the countdown for Friday's total solar eclipse nears zero, "umbraphiles" from around the world are flocking to remote parts of the far north in the hope of finding clear skies.

Events during April's lunar eclipse

Solar and Lunar Eclipses in 2015

Two total lunar eclipses occur this year, on April 4th and September 27−28. Meanwhile, a total solar eclipse in March sweeps across remote Arctic waters on March 20th, and a partial event on September 13th is likewise poorly placed for observing. Any list of nature's grandest spectacles would certainly include eclipses of the Sun...

Lovejoy-and-M79_Schur

Where To See Comet Lovejoy Tonight

The new Comet Lovejoy, C/2014 Q2, should brighten from 5th to 4th magnitude from late December through January as it climbs into excellent viewing position for the Northern Hemisphere, high in the dark winter sky.

Comet-2014Q2_Rhemann_Nov-27-2014_489x274

Binocular Comet Lovejoy Heading Our Way

A new Comet Lovejoy, C/2014 Q2, is heading our way. It may brighten to 5th magnitude from late December through much of January as it climbs into excellent viewing position for the Northern Hemisphere, high in the dark winter sky.