Astronomy News

This is your portal to astronomy news, the celestial reports and observing tips that make you say, “wow!” Here you’ll learn the latest on Curiosity’s Martian trek and discover why the detection of gravitational waves heralded a new era of astronomy. Find out why mysteriously quiet solar cycles have astronomers scratching their heads about the nature of our Sun. And this is the place to be if you’re seeking the best meteor showers of the year or glimpses of the most recent green comet gracing our skies.

For all of the latest astronomical events, count on Sky & Telescope’s editors and bloggers to keep you up to speed. We pride ourselves on our accurate, in-depth reporting of current astronomy news — instead of sound bites, we want to give you what you need to really understand the latest space events, whether they be observations from orbiters around Mars or the discovery of what’s to blame for powerful cosmic explosions. We talk to the experts, and then we talk to you. So if you’re looking for responsible science journalism, look no further: here you’ll find the facts behind the headlines.

Let’s Find Pluto!

At opposition this week and as bright as it will be for the next 190 years, it's time to find your way to Pluto, a frigid enigma at the edge of night.

Exploring the Minispiral at the Milky Way’s Center

The region around Sgr A*, the 4-million-solar-mass black hole at the heart of our galaxy, is a complex and dynamic place. New Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the Milky Way’s center now reveal more about this harsh, inhospitable environment.

Solar Spectroscope

How to Build on the Solar Eclipse Experience

Eclipse-related outreach activities will abound this August, but how do we best capitalize on this rare celestial event after it happens? Astronomers Without Borders has developed a Sun-focused curriculum and is looking for volunteers to help teachers implement it.

A Partly Cloudy Exoplanet

Direct imaging of exoplanets was once only possible for the brightest of planets orbiting the dimmest of stars — but improving technology is turning this into an increasingly powerful technique. In a new study, direct-imaging observations of the Jupiter-like exoplanet 51 Eridani b provide tantalizing clues about its atmosphere.